“…whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God…” 1 Corinthians 10:31

“…that we…might be to the praise of his glory…” Ephesians 1:12

On his Faith and Theology blog a couple of weeks ago, Ben Myers gave some tips about the writing life. He gave a summary of his morning writing routine (which might double for anyone’s routine doing the work they’ve been given to do), followed by simple words: “And do it all to the glory of God.”

The key to all Christian work, and all Christian life, is to “do it all to the glory of God.” All of life can and ought to be lived to the glory of God. Doing something to the glory of God, I guess, refers to doing it in a spirit of gratitude and praise to God for not only his saving action in Christ but for the grace of every day we live. Quite apart from things that are obvious sins, we can look at any of those everyday activities and realize, if it can’t be done to the glory of God, it doesn’t belong. So I’ve been thinking about what can and can’t be done to the glory of God. Here’s a sampling.

I can spend an evening out with my wife to the glory of God.
I can play a game with my kids to the glory of God.
I can listen to a friend to the glory of God.
I can read a novel to the glory of God.
I can write a sermon to the glory of God.
I can shovel snow to the glory of God.
I can worship on Sunday morning to the glory of God.
I can give to the needy to the glory of God.
I can even suffer to the glory of God.

I can grieve with someone to the glory of God.
I can hold a bucket for a sick child to the glory of God.

Any or all of these things might be part of my life on a given week. And I can do them all to the glory of God.

But I can’t worry to the glory of God.

As a pastor, worry is a temptation that threatens me almost everyday. But again, I assume this is true for everyone else as much as for me: to dwell on things that are not in my control, and get distracted from the many things I can do to the glory of God.

I can’t worry to the glory of God.

Trying to stop something like worry is, to borrow a simile from P.G. Wodehouse, “like trying to stop Niagara with a tennis racket.” So the answer isn’t to focus on Not-Worrying. Not-Worrying is a non-solution. My best solution, when I catch myself beginning to worry, is to look at all the things I can do to the glory of the God, and start to do it.